Evolution of The Source Engine

Evolution of The Source Engine


The Source Engine has gone through many changes
throughout the years, being introduced in 2004 from Counter Strike –
Source, my goal here today is document the differences between all of them. If you want to skip to a specific game, go
to the timestamp linked in the description below. Counter-Strike Source: The source engine was introduced in this game
way back in 2004, and because of it being the first game, the engine itself changed
a ton. And as I don’t want to go out of my way to
get a sketchy build from 2004, I will only be comparing
what the game is like since its last *engine* update, which is around 2011. Movement: The movement in CS:S was balanced around the
Counter-Strike game formula, being a bit slower than other games such
as Half Life, there is a noticable “Momentum” to the characters, ergo, it takes a bit to
speed up, slow down, etc. One way to get around this however, is by
jumping. Jumping and landing however, slows all momentum
down. HOWEVER, there is a “bug” in the game that
Valve has tried to patch (and actually succeced) named “Bunnyhopping”
Bunnyhopping occurs when you jump the frame you hit the ground, jumping as soon as you
land allows you build up speed, up to some crazy speeds. This, was patched mostly in future updates
however, and is now is capped to a certain degree in all future games. All Counter-Strike games change your speed
depending on what weapon you’re using, for instance, you’ll run slower
with an M4 out when compared to a knife. In Counter Strike Source, all pistols move
you at the same speed. Ragdolls in this game are much more realistic,
as the body has much more weight and the like. When you move the camera around, the weapon
moves with it. Framerate: The framerate in CS:S is fantastic. Keep in mind, this will vary in all machines,
but almost anything can run this game, averaging at about 300 FPS at all times,
even in battle. Settings: The settings in CS:S are fairly similar to
what is in most games today, (except for CS:GO), whereas you have the
basic Texture, Model, And the like, but you also have “Multiplayer” which allows you to
customise your crosshair, spray, and more things hidden away in the
“Advanced tab”, there is a strange option to choose your “dxlevel”
in the video, however, this only brings up dxlevel 9. Graphics: The graphics in CS:S are very 2004 like, with
grummy textures and all that, but, as the game got updates, new
graphical features were updated, such as HDR. Dispite this, in my honest opinion, HDR does
not look great with alot of CS:S’s textures, as many complaints exist
of it being way too bright, and I can agree with that. The following footage you are seeing right
now is taken with all the settings at max, (except for Motion blur) Model wise, they don’t look too bad, and they
hold up… decently enough, however, the general low quality of them
has become more apparently in the faces and textures on some camo pants. Texture wise, the game looks.. meh. Even on “Very High” the textures do not look
nice when viewed at a close angle. Effects in the game are rarely seen, except
for when the bomb explodes, and even then, it’s not important. For what it is, the game looks decent for
being near 14 years old. Half Life Source: Half-Life Source is a remake in the source
engine for the original Half-Life, released in 1999. As such, it’s
alot different to most of the games on this video, (note: This applies to all of the “Re-makes”
such as “Day Of Defeat” and “Half Life Deathmatch”) Movement: The movement in Half Life – Source, as thus
all the other games is one of the fastest in the series. Bunny hopping in this version is quite weird,
as there doesn’t SEEM to be cap, but you can still go incredibly fast. There are things you can do to uncap the speed,
with injecting the game and all that faff, but I again, refuse to do
it. Settings: Exactly the same as HL2. Not much to say. Graphics: The game only got a source makeover, not model
updates. So, the original models are there in their
1999 glory. So,
no, the graphics do not look good for today’s standards.. I mean, look at the faces…*shiver* Half Life 2: Half-Life 2 was the first game that introduced
the Source Engine, being older than CS:S, I showed that one
first because of a big update that hit the game in 2007, “The Orange Box” update. Which was basically Source 2 before Source
2 was a thing. This had
multiple changes to the engine, most of which are covered in this image, from SourceRuns.org. As I do not have access to the old engine,
I will be comparing the new engine in this video. Movement: The Movement in Half-Life 2 extremely faster
than in CS:S, being able to sprint is only icing on the cake, landing
after jumping will no longer slow you down as it did in CS:S, and the biggest thing,
bunny-hopping. Or, accelerated back hopping. This occurs when you
sprint, jump, turn around and bunny hop backwards while crouching, this occurs because
Valve tried to cap your speed while moving forward, however, since
you’re moving backwards, it keeps on ADDING speed to you, up to as fast as you
can go without smacking into a wall. Settings: The settings in Half-Life 2 are extremely
similar to the ones in CS:S, so this part won’t be long. Apart from there being no “Multiplayer” option,
as, Half-Life 2, itself does not contain any multiplayer of the
sort, so having it would be unneeded. Graphics: The Graphics in Half-Life 2 are better than
the ones in CS:S, however, the textures are mostly still the same,
except for the floors have very nice reflective properties to them.. so that’s a plus, I guess. Models in the game look extremely dated. Even more-so here than in CS:S, as most of
the time, armour covers up the faces in that game, here, you can see the
faces in full 2004 (or 7) detail. The explosions and such in the game look basically
the same as in CS:S, so just take what I said from that and apply
it here. They look nice. The HDR in this game is much better, as there
aren’t as many bright textures in the game, so it doesn’t SCREAM at
your eyeballs whenever you look at something that’s brighter than a lightbulb. Overall, the graphics in this game hold up
again, quite well, considering its 2007 “make-over” of sorts, as well. Half Life 2 – Episode 1: Half Life 2 Episode 1 was released in 2006,
2 years after the original release of Half Life 2. The game was mostly a story continuation,
so, not much changed in the engine, as such, this part will be brief. The movement and settings are exactly the
same as in HL2, so, not even worth covering here. Graphics: The graphics DID get a bit of a touch-up,
models look better and the textures also, got an update.. for the most part. Trash and the like, look like.. well,
trash. Other than that, however, it’s mostly just
the same thing. Half Life 2- Episode 2: The second episode’s only change is graphical,
HDR looks better. That’s about it. Team Fortress 2: Team Fortress 2 is.. well, how to say MUCH
different than other games with the source engine, as there are multiple
classes to choose from, you can’t keep the speed and such the exact same from across
all games. TF2 has had many updates that has changed
the engine, luckily, I have an original build of the game.. from SFM. So, with comparisons I will be using the SFM
beta build of TF2. Movement: TF2’s movement varies across classes, and
as most of you are coming from a TF2 based channel, I hope most of you
know how each class moves. When it comes to the build I have, one thing
that I noticed, apart from the blinding textures, is that the classes
(for the most part) control and go at the same speeds as you would expect, except for
spy, who moves at a normal 100%, as that was not changed until Meet Your
Match. However, one thing I did notice is that ragdolls
are much MUCH different. (atleast when it comes to suicide.) In the current game, when you end your life,
your body stops dead in its tracks, flopping to the ground and obeying
no laws of bones or anything, however, in the early build here, your body preserves
the momentum you had before you died, and the ragdolls seem to be more “structured”
I guess the word would be. They bounce and float a bit more
as well. Here is a side by side comparison. Pretty odd. Apart from that, nothing much has made too
drastic of note. Settings: The same as current, just much less defined
as “Team Fortress’y” and for some reason the text wants to be gigantic. Graphics: A lot has changed here, a video was made covering
changes from 2007, which I will link below. Mainly, the gist of
the video is that the graphics seem to have gotten less realistic, but, that’s an argument
I won’t get into. The undeniable fact is that something is different. Could it be that staring at rocks in the sfm
build WITHOUT bloom on still burns your retinas? Could be. Portal: Like another game using the source engine,
“The Stanley Parable,” Portal, started out as a game using a complete rip
of the half life 2 engine, just adding onto things to suit the game’s needs. In this early state, according to
Valve News Network’s video on this topic, Tyler states: Now, I could just use this video as a reference
for the rest of the part of this part of the video, but, if you want
to see this video in full, link is in the description. I will say, many things will be used from
the video, as, finding an old copy of portal is harder than you think it
is, a usual method of getting this is to go into betas, but, nope. So, away we go. Movement: The movement in the build of Portal I have,
and, as I can assume from Tyler’s video, as he states: Is the same as the retail, a couple things
are different, in this game, you can do an ABH, or, accelerated
backhop, as mentioned earlier, bunnyhopping forward seems to be a bit harder to do, but,
is *kind of still possible. Other than that, take what I said about the
Half-Life 2 movement, and apply it here. It’s almost the same. Settings: I have come a long way to finally get to be
able to say this… The settings menu is different!… By like, one menu. This, being a portal game, there is a “portal
render depth” option, which affects how many portals the
game will render before either stopping completely, or, just doing some
magic and doing some weird stuff I cannot explain myself. Other than that, it’s the same. Graphics: Apart from the aforementioned portal render
depth, the game overall looks the same, one difference, is that the
game contains blood looks fairly similar to a lot of other games I’ve played, but, it’s
there. And looks different
than most of the other game’s source runs on with blood in, except for say, Garry’s
Mod and HL2 to an extent. Portal 2: Portal 2 was released in 2011, so as we move
onto the 2010s of the games being covered, we also move onto the first (in this video)
of games actually using their own settings menu without using
this drab thing. As for the history of Portal 2, the beta,
from old shaky cam footage from 2010, taken at an IGN
panel, we can definitely hear the difference in Wheatley’s voice,
and uh, that was a change, just listen to it here. Thank god for said change, or I don’t think
Wheatley would’ve won multiple awards. If you want to delve even further back into
Portal 2’s history, you can find some interesting stuff if you dig far enough. Movement: The movement in Portal 2 is actually quite
different from Portal 1. In Portal 1, ABH was the main method of transportation,
however, in Portal 2, ABH is basically impossible, but, normal bunnyhopping seems to remain. You no longer gain as much horizontal movement
than you did in Portal 1, but instead, some of that has transferred over to
a vertical leap. So, as you can imagine, this does a lot of
things, just, generally. For instance, the entire change of speedruns,
I mean.. look at this, I don’t know what’s going on either. Again, that seems to be it, the bunnyhopping
mechanic was nerfed, massively. Graphics: Portal 2 doesn’t look bad at all, there are
no humans in the game (besides Chell, as a physical model), the critique of the
human face is.. almost never here.. Until you look at chell up-close in a portal,
and, this happens. I’m thankful for the lack of humans, now. Texture wise, the game looks decent, even
moreso in the early “decayed” levels, and what player/entity models
there are, still look fantastic after 7 or 8 years later. Settings: As I said before, Portal 2 is the first game
in this video to have it’s own custom settings menu, unlike games past,
so as such, we get, what seems to be, less options. You can no longer adjust your FOV from the
game menu, unlike, again, games past. So you must enable the dev console and fiddle
about with it there. Luckily, the game is auto-set to 90 so as
to not make everyone throw up upon playing the
game. Overall, Portal 2 is a good step in the gaming
world from 2011. Left 4 Dead: The first Left 4 Dead was released way back
in 2008, and for it being released for around that time, the
cult that Valve made around the old options menu was finally broken, as, this was the
first game (to my knowledge) to use its own options menu, and, honestly,
being a bit better than Portal 2’s, but, I won’t start a debate here. The history of Left 4 Dead is, again, an interesting
one. I will give a condensed version here, you
can read up about it in your own time, but, being developed
in 2005, and bought by valve in 2007. only to be released
later.. On the Orange Box as a teaser, because valve
sure loves doing that. Finally, being released in 2008, the game,
of course, uses the 2008 version of the Source Engine, which allowed
multicore rendering.. as useless as it is using the source engine. But, also allowing for hair and clothing to
move “realistically” with movement, also to portray zombies being shoved in different
locations allowing for different results. Animation wise, characters lean left, right,
etc. when following a path, mostly noticeable on the DLC maps in the
game, and the addition to multiple small effects, such as film grain and a vignette around the
screen. Movement: Movement in the first Left For Dead game is
quite slow, as you’d imagine for a zombie survival game, so things like
bunnyhopping is completely impossible, unless you’re jumping down a cliff, and if that’s
the case, stop jumping, or you might end up splat dead on the ground. There is a dedicated walk button, on the shift
key, which is ported over from Counter Strike. Not much else to say. Graphics: Graphics, besides looking muddy in some areas,
looks decent if you don’t look too hard, however, I mentioned
earlier that the source engine gave the game an update when it comes to rainy areas, which,
ages.. okay I guess. In the first game, when it comes to the blood
and gore, or, blood and minor gore, you can just shoot limbs off,
which did eventually change in left 4 dead 2, which, I will get into soon. But, other than slightly improved textures,
and the earlier mentioned film grain and vignette, this game looks just about what you’d expect
from a 2008 game. Settings: The settings menu is unique, again. Using a much more detailed way of showing
options, and giving you more to choose from, if I were a critic of option
menus, I’d give this a good 7/10. But I’m not.. So I’ll give it an 8/10. Left 4 Dead 2: Being released, literally, one year after
the first game, in 2009. And so, for that short gap, there was not
a whole ton of changes, engine wise, what changes
did occur, are gameplay focused, story focused, etc. Because of all of
this, this part of the video will be extremely short. I will just cover history, and a couple of
small changes here and there, and, one large change. Movement: *The EXACT same* Graphics: One major difference with graphics in this
game, is the blood and gore effects, there is an entire slideshow on
it, which is a bit worrying, but, looking through it, as I said before, the blood effects
were massively overhauled. As with most of the links I have mentioned,
there will be links in the description. Settings: Left For Dead 2 has a similar options menu
than the one in L4D1, with the only exception having it to be more
responsive. So, take that as you will. Counter Strike: Global Offensive With the release of CSGO in 2012, it also
marks the last game being covered here, and, again, luckily, steam
provides an early build of the game, for anyone wanting to install it, go here. According to the Developer Commentary website,
written by valve on CS:GO, they state that in this game,
Light-Mapped ambient occlusion, real-time outdoor shadow mapping, and normal-maps upon
the release of the game. Whether or not these are 100% and used is
up for debate. Anyway, onto the main part. Movement: In CS:GO, bunnyhopping has been a debated
topic, and I will make my stance known on this one. It is impossible to consistently bunnyhop
in CS:GO. CS:GO WILL mark your speed down after a certain
point. This much is undebatable. However, it still is possible to bunnyhop,
so, that’s part of it. Again, since this is a Counter-Strike game,
it is around the formula of the game, so, normally, your
basic movement speed is MUCH slower than other games in the source engine. As for the early build, nothing has changed,
besides minor things like the weight of some weapons,
(i.e how much they slow you down for) But, as that is more gameplay focused, I won’t
cover it. Graphics: CSGO’s old screenshots make the game look
quite good, and when you first boot it up (during scaleform)
your first impressions are NOT based around graphics, more around the blasting sound,
as csgo loves to do. But, anyway, on highest settings, CS:GO does
not look that bad, even in the early build, however,
as time went on, the graphics did improve. As you’d hope. Settings: Oh boy. A lot has changed with the settings menu over
the years, I’ll be primary going over the Source 2
version as implemented by panorama, but if you want to have a more in-depth looksie at
all the versions, take a look at 3kliksphilip’s video on this,
very interesting stuff, link in the description. With panorama, we finally get to the end. The top of the top, and we also find Valve’s
favourite effect. Gaussian Blur, because Jesus Christ look at
the amount of it. Jokes aside, this is easily my favourite options/settings
menu to date. Changing settings doesn’t take 20
years to do either, which is always needed, since, older games would sometimes alt-tab
you out of the game for a couple seconds. Either way, I love this menu. Extras: Hidden deep within the steam client, there
is a “tools” section, this is mainly used for the hammer editor for a lot
of people, but, in this case, there are stress tests for source engine devs, one for 2006,
2007, and for 2013. I will be showing them in full, just sped
up, there are a couple minor differences between them, see if you can
spot them.

Leave a Response

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

100 thoughts on “Evolution of The Source Engine”